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jocelyn hagerman

I have been riding for 15 months and I purchased a horse two months ago. We were doing very well, until I feel off of him. since then everytime I enter his stall his ears go back and he has a bad attitude towards me. He even threatened me with a little kick. how can i get his respect again....I am trying to do it and not allowing this attitude...what can I do?

Darren Wetherill


Bad attitude can be mistaken for your horses attempt to be the dominate one.Horses are always playing dominance games to see who is the leader these games can go on for days or be finished with a flurry of bites and kikes all though each day the order is reestablished or challenged.
To change a horses attitude and gain its respect is to become its leader,this is established through playing dominance games,One game thy like to play is the speed game.
For use humans we have to prove to them that we are fast enough to herd them with out acting like a predator.It is best to play in side a round pen so each time the horse runs off he ends up coming back to wards you where you can send/herd him in different direction

An technique you can use when your horse ears go back and attempts to boss you or to get him to change directions is us a horsemans training stick and tap your horse on the lips to drive him away, do this with out being aggressive or emotional. The better you can direct his nose by taping or flagging the more your horse will respect your ability to be the leader.The same goes for the back end of your horse teach it to yield its hind end away from you with a stick or rope making sure you maintain a safe distance approximately six feet.Some times a horse will challenge you back with a few rhythmic flicks of his on tools ,so be aware of his attempts to dominate and be persistent until he yields away with ease. Do this little each day to maintain the pecking order and after you are confided you are able to herd him try it at feeding time keeping him from his feed until he is calm and relaxed.

Darren

suzannah northcott

how can i teach my 2 week old foal to stand still and allow me to pat and halter her?

Breanda Taylor

I bought a pinto arabian at the age of 5 months and weaned her. I handled her alot and thought I was gaining her trust but when she was almost 11 months, while haltering my mustang , Skye came around my blindside and slammed me in the face with her mouth when I came to she bucked and her front foot crushed my foot, broke it and severed some nerves, after 5 months of healing, surgery and rehab. I am now back at her. I have never had a baby before and have never had a problem haltering a horse. I am at my WITS END!!! I can get it on her face but as I try to tie it she is gone. she either tries to bite or turns to run. She is now 17 months old and I am lost. I have joined and gtried Clinton Anderson methods to no avail. Listened to others and tried my own instinct tactics. I know I still have a il fear but I do my best to not let her know it. Is it my fault because of the injury that I am doing this?

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